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Designing for Mobile and Accessibility

Designing for Mobile and Accessibility

Making websites accessible for people with disabilities is an integral part of high quality websites (in some cases, it's a legal requirement!).

As a designer at Focus, that's a big responsibility. It's easy to get overwhelmed by all the things to consider when designing for accessibility. I'm an active member of the web accessibility community in Bristol and often attend presentations that can get very technical and propel me far from the safety of my design knowledge. It's at this point that I call on a skill I've had my whole life: empathy. An important thing to remember is that accessibility is about understanding people and the barriers that they face.

Many of the barriers people with disabilities are faced with, also effect people using mobile devices when interacting with web content. Some examples of this include the fact that mobile phone users will struggle if a website's navigation requires the use of a mouse. Similarly, desktop computer users with a motor disability will have a hard time using a website if they can't use a mouse.

Some shared experiences are comparable to temporary disability; If you need to use your mobile to access a website when you're at a concert, the noise that surrounds you likely means you are experiencing the website similar to how a deaf person would. Equally you may struggle reading small text as those with low vision do with most text. The iPhone is less than 10% of a typical desktop screen. 'Fat fingers' denying you all accuracy could equate to difficulties faced by those with hand tremors. A 40 pixel finger is big on a small target! Mobile is disabling for everyone.

There are guidelines to help you keep accessibility in mind, such as the BBC's mobile accessibility guidelines http://www.bbc.co.uk/guidelines/futuremedia/accessibility/mobile and of course Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20/

Getting your own experience of accessibility helps you to put yourself in the shoes of others and keep accessibility in mind when building and testing your website.

So next time you wonder whether a design feature is accessible and immediately rely on tools such as a colour contrast checker, first consider disabilities of all levels and the struggles faced by others and maybe even yourself . Surely I'm not the only one who's complained of 'fat fingers'?

 

Jordana Jeffrey
Jordana

Created on Thursday December 24 2015 10:24 AM


Tags: accessibility webdesign


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