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Find out more about Google's changing stance on secure sites in our latest blog post https://t.co/Jfw1kYy2hR #SSL https://t.co/0s3dYMos6R, posted 4 months ago

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December 2016


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UK-based Web Accessibility Courses

UK-based Web Accessibility Courses

A couple of years ago I was nominated as the ‘accessibility champion’ for focus. You may recall this from my blog in which I manage to compare myself to Muhammad Ali (who says the title of champion went to my head?). 

Web accessibility is about making your website available to as many users as possible, broadening your audience. So it’s win-win for both users and companies. More employers should benefit from assigning this important role to a team member to network, extend reach and spread knowledge within the company. They don’t have to be an expert already. I’m regularly browsing the web to discover further developments within accessibility. I am delighted to have seen this recognition of the importance of web accessibility go from a subtle nod to an enthusiastic wave.

Initially it was hard work, I was desperate to acquire some training, learn from the experts. I’ve lost count of how many times I've found a course, excitedly attempted to book tickets, only to find the price is in dollars. Oh, THAT Bristol. Pretty sure I can still see my keyboard’s space bar indented in my forehead from those moments. 

If you find you’re still suffering from the same frustration, fortunately, the UK has caught on and more and more training is becoming available. So I’ve put together a list of UK-based training to look forward to in 2017…  

Implement Web Accessibility
 A 1-day website accessibility course provides the technical requirements for building accessible websites using HTML and CSS, i.e. how to: 

- Provide accessible web images, multimedia and text alternatives
- Provide accessible links and navigation
- Ensure that textual content is accessible
- Ensure that colour is used safely
- Make table navigation and data accessible
- Make form navigation, data, and data entry accessible

Understand Web Accessibility
Being held in London, Leeds, Manchester and Cardiff, this is a one day website accessibility training course providing the essential background knowledge for implementing good web accessibility. Understand:

- The requirements of different disabled users
- Problems conventional web designs cause disabled users
- Requirements of UK law and web accessibility standards

Coming to Bristol and various other locations across the UK is this course: Web Accessibility Fundamentals, it brings together the previous two 1-day courses in a single package - because successful website accessibility depends on proper integration between awareness and practical implementation.

Web accessibility training 
Design for every user. Hands-on web accessibility training, small class sizes, highly interactive and taught by experts:

- Learn about the different user groups and their specific accessibility needs.
- Review the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG)
- Find out how to implement accessibility
- Learn how to devise and implement accessibility testing
- Create an accessibility action plan

Web Accessibility and Usability 
This course will enable those attending to gain a thorough understanding of Web Accessibility and Usability issues. Techniques for achieving accessibility standards will be covered, along with informal recommendations for delegates’ own websites.

 

Jordana Jeffrey
Jordana

Created on Wednesday December 28 2016 09:21 PM


Tags: accessibility training


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What does SSL mean?

With 2017 seeing Google continue their campaign against insecure web sites (read my blog to find out more), we thought this was a good opportunity to look behind the abbreviations and discover what SSL and HTTPS mean and the impact they have on everyday web site visitors.

1. SSL stands for ‘Secure Sockets Layer.’ In layman’s terms, this is a secure way of sending information over the Internet. Any data transferred 'over SSL' - such as web page content from a server to your browser - gets encrypted prior to being sent over the web for viewing.

2. Many websites use SSL for secure areas of their sites, particularly user accounts and online checkouts. As information is encrypted, the theory is that even if someone unwelcome gets hold of it, they'll be unable to do anything with it.

3. SSL is applied to your website – or parts of your website – by way of a digital certificate, which is purchased and added to your domain to demonstrate its security to users. It also ensures any content from that domain is encypted.

4. When you visit a website whose address starts with ‘https’, the ‘s’ after the ‘http’ indicates the website is secure, and has SSL. You should also see a padlock before the https, like below:

5. SSL keeps personal data such as your name, address or credit card information between you and the merchant who you are sending it to.

6. If you want to find out more information about a site’s security, by clicking the ‘i’ icon, or right-clicking the padlock, you can get more details.

7. Like everything in life, there's a wide range of SSL certificates available and they vary in features and price. Some are free but will require ongoing administration, others are more expensive but offer the tightest security including the strongest encyption algorithms and verification checks. 

SSL is likely to be a hot topic in 2017 with Google's planned warnings for insecure web sites.

If you’d like to know more about SSL, securing your site and how to get an SSL certificate, please get in touch.

Annette Ryske
Annette

Created on Tuesday December 13 2016 01:30 PM


Tags: website google ssl security


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Google and Secure Sites

Google are big believers in HTTPS and SSL - they've been focused on making the web 'more secure' for all of us for some time now. One way in which they do this is to prioritise secure web sites in their search results, and another is showing a site's security status in the address bar within their native browser, Chrome.

2017 will see Google continue this campaign with some significant new features. Early in the year, Chrome will start to display additional security warnings for specific pages on web sites that are not secure – so HTTP, not HTTPS. These warnings will be fairly stark, as shown, and aPicture of Google non-secure warnings you can imagine, not the most reassuring sight for a visitor to your web site.

As time passes, Google have said that their criteria will gradually become stricter and the warnings will also be added to all non-secure pages - the aim is, by some point in 2017, to mark all HTTP sites as ‘non-secure’ with a red security indicator.

This is likely to have considerable impact. Google Chrome currently accounts for 47% of all UK web users, so these warnings are going to be seen by a lot of people. Equally, Google will continue to rank non-secure sites lower in their search results. And history has shown that what Google does, others follow, and we're likely to see a similar approach adopted by other browsers such as Safrari, Firefox and Internet Explorer. 

Web site owners who have or do not move to SSL will suffer not just the effect on web traffic and performance, but there is a risk to jeopardising customer trust.

If your website does not yet have SSL / HTTPS, or you’d like to know more about how to make your website more secure – and therefore more favourable with Google – please get in touch.

Google’s official article about these changes is available on their blog.

You may also like to read my blog which explains what SSL and HTTPS really means.

Annette Ryske
Annette

Created on Tuesday December 13 2016 01:28 PM


Tags: google chrome ssl security


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