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October 2015


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Hartlepool Now web site launched

Hartlepool Now web site launched

Monday 19th October saw Simon and Annette travel north to join Hartlepool Borough Council for the launch of Hartlepool Now, a new web site created by the team at Focus that helps the local authority meet new information duties from The Care Act 2014.

Taking place at Hartlepool College of Further Education, the launch event was a great success. Attendees had a number of workshops to choose from including a run through of the web site itself, a demonstration of the new online Equipment Finder and a chance to see The Ricochet Project from local charity Incontrolable, which lends tablets to disabled people in the community and provides basic training in using them.

Following the workshops, Hartlepool Now was officially launched by council Chief Executive Gill Alexander, who stated that the new web site "helped Hartlepool set a new standard for publishing clear information and advice".

Our branded cupcakes went down a treat as well.

A massive thanks to the project team at Hartlepool for inviting us to the launch, it was great to be part of the event and hear the positive feedback the web site is already receiving.

Annette Ryske
Annette

Created on Friday October 23 2015 11:36 AM


Tags: website thecareact


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Introducing Rife Guide

Introducing Rife Guide

Rife Guide is a dynamic online platform where young people can keep up to date with what’s happening in Bristol and get involved in a wide range of activities. Part of Bristol City Council's pioneering online virtual youth service and created by Focus in partnership with Watershed, Rife Guide is managed by a team of talented young journalists, content creators and editors who know what’s important to Bristol’s young people.

Rife Guide includes a calendar of events and activities in Bristol as well as information and advice on important issues such as housing, drugs and sexual health. What’s more, visitors can create a login that will give them access to a portal of content that is appropriate to them - events and services are suited to their age and preferences and then pushed to them every time they log in, without the need to search.

As well as being a hub for young people, Rife Guide is also a platform where local businesses, organisations and providers can promote their services - they too can create a login and upload the details of their organisation or event which is then moderated by the Rife team before being published to the website.

Annette Ryske of Focus says the involvement of young people at all stages of the project has been crucial in it's success:
"Consultation was key. From the very beginning, we worked closely with Watershed on a series of workshops and engagement sessions with both service providers and target users. This involved visiting local schools, youth groups, clubs and children in local authority care. Our work with providers led the development of systems for publishing their information quickly and efficiently."
"Working with young people showed us that the majority of their internet use was via mobile, they were using social media to share content and the content itself should consist of less text and be rich in images and video."

Now that Rife Guide is live, ongoing engagement with young people is more important than ever, and we are already planning new content and features based on feedback from users. 

Annette Ryske
Annette

Created on Friday October 23 2015 09:39 AM


Tags: website


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Accessible Colours and Web Design

Accessible Colours and Web Design

For some it's driving fast cars, for others it's a risky bungee jump, for me I get plenty of excitement from discovering handy tools like this accessible colour palette generator! colorsafe.co
Stay with me, I'll get a life right after I tell you why this is worth shouting about...

Colour is super important in web design. It's not only used to make the website visually appealing but also to increase it's usability and accessibility.

What we must remember is not to assign too much meaning to colour in web design as this is of no use to users who cannot view the colour as you intend them to. That’s why when designing a website you should ensure that the information conveyed with colour is also provided through another means.

We must also ensure there is sufficient color contrast for all content. The goal is to make sure that all visual designs meet the minimum color-contrast ratio for normal and large text on a background. There is a lot to consider but this colour palette generator does much of the thinking for you. It is based on WCAG Guidelines of text and background contrast ratios.

You simply set up the canvas and text by entering a background color and the styling of your text. Then accessible text colours are generated with WCAG Guidelines recommended contrast ratios. Ready for you to simply pick your favourite!

 

Jordana Jeffrey
Jordana

Created on Tuesday October 20 2015 10:48 AM


Tags: web-design usability web onlinetool


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Designing for Accessibility

Designing for Accessibility

Guesswork can only get you so far before it becomes a problem. My 'genius' theory of 'If in doubt choose B' served me well in my multiple choice French exam. It proved less useful in my oral exam when I told my teacher I keep a large duck in my kitchen every other day.
Yet it's come to light that many people with disabilities are navigating websites with the help of good guesswork, such as assuming the 'Contact' button will be the last link in the navigation bar.

A website should be intuitive to anybody who chooses to use it. Nobody should have to guess their way around and risk missing much of it's content. Accessibility enables people with disabilities to perceive, understand, navigate, interact with, and contribute to the web.

Alastair Campbell oversees both usability and development aspects at Nomense, a company that believes, just as we at focus do, that everybody has the right to access inclusive design, regardless of ability. He spoke with us about the importance of considering accessibility right from the start of the design process. We want to share a few of those things with you.

Skip links
The main content is often not the first thing on a web page. Keyboard and screen reader users tend to have to navigate a long list of links, sub-lists, corporate icons and more before ever arriving at the main content. So these users will thank you for enabling them to bypass or 'skip' over repetitive web page content. You can press the tab key on the Nomensa site for an example of a skip link http://www.nomensa.com/

Keyboard test
You should be able to achieve everything with keyboard controls alone.

• tab key to progress through links and controls
• shift-tab to reverse
• enter to follow links
• space to select form controls (e.g. tick boxes)
• cntl-f / cmd-f to find a link or text

Have a go on the BBC website for a good example http://www.bbc.co.uk/ and the Zoopla one where you'll get lost the moment you reach the first drop down menu http://www.zoopla.co.uk/

Zoom view
On many sites, the closer you zoom in, the more of the site's content is lost off-screen. Not with the Microsoft website: https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/ this responsive site behaves as if you are viewing it on a smaller device each time you zoom, so eventually you are looking at a mobile view with all content still easily accessible.

User input
Make sure the results of user input happens close to where they perform the action. To experience the difficulties that incur if you don't, zoom in on this website https://www.overclockers.co.uk/index.php and add something to the basket. When you do, you're left wondering as nothing appears to change, unless of course you navigate all the way to the top right of the screen and view your basket. Do the same on amazon and an 'Added to Basket' notice immediately appears within view. Yes, that ab-cruncher I'll never use is mine all mine!

Alistair, photographed above, says there are 4 questions to ask yourself:

• Can you use it with a keyboard?
• Can you see it when zoomed?
• Does it provide appropriate information to
screen readers?
• Is it easy to understand?

Yes, it's a lot to take in and on the surface it may seem that this will limit your creativity. If anything, these guidelines will push these limits as you discover visually pleasing designs that improve the online experience for a wider set of users. And that's a fact. Even in French.

Jordana Jeffrey
Jordana

Created on Friday October 16 2015 11:42 AM


Tags: website technology web-development accessibility ux


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